Google Removes ‘Labeled for Reuse’ Options from Google Image Search Tools

Google Removes ‘Labeled for Reuse’ Options from Google Image Search Tools

Google has removed the features Labeled for Reuse and Labeled for Reuse with Modification from its image search tools.

In a quiet move, Google has removed both the “Labeled for Reuse” and “Labeled for Reuse with Modification” feature from its image search tools.

To remove an entire subset of imagery that, at the advice of Google itself, people should use, is disarming.

It has long been known that Google gives priority to unique content and that stock images can often negatively affect SERPs on your website.

The NEW option amidst the others that were removed in the image search tools usage rights is “Creative Commons Licenses”.Upon first glance, this seems like a good update.

Aaron Swartz, the late co-founder of Reddit and pioneer for a decentralized, open-sourced internet, played a large role in the early stages of the development of Creative Commons.

However, unlike the “Labeled for Reuse”, and “Labeled for Reuse with Modification” options, every Creative Commons license requires that you provide attribution to the original creator as well as the link to the original work.

While all the Labeled for Reuse and Labeled for Reuse with Modification Images still required further investigation to determine whether the license required assignment, most of the images in these categories did not.

What Does This Mean To Advertisers & Marketers?

We will see a huge influx of SEOs adapt Creative Commons licensing in order to build links. Big brands such as Boxed Water and The Honest Company have already adopted these strategies on websites like Unsplash and Pexels, but even on those platforms, you are allowed to reuse and modify the image, with just a suggested, but not required attribution.

Certain creator content is now seemingly completely de-indexed unless it holds a Creative Commons license. You know that pet name directory that was built in 2009 using Dreamweaver and Artisteer whose unknowingly optimized alt tags had the images ranking on the first page for big money keywords? Gone.

Image rankings are going to take a huge hit, so keep your finger on the pulse, start creating your own content, and hit a CC license on it if you want to get ahead of the impact.

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